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Static note on adversarial scores: You will be given points for each thoughtful, focused response to the questions below, with no limit to the number of points you can earn during any adversarial reflection period.  Each post will be closed after 48 or 72 hours, depending on the day the reflection is assigned.  You are encouraged to return often to each post to read your peers’ responses; if you offer thoughtful, focused feedback to a peer’s comment, it is worth twice as many points.  See the original post on adversarial augmentation for more information on adversarial work. 

Final Exam Reflection: Part 4

For this portion of the exam, you were given a critical lens statement to interpret.  Then you were asked to write a full-length essay that applied that interpretation to two works of literature.  You were required to use Animal Farm and one of the other texts you studied this year.  To reflect on your performance, answer any of the following questions in the comments:

  1. What was your interpretation of the critical lens, and what was your initial reaction to using it?
  2. Which other work of literature did you choose, and why?
  3. What literary elements and techniques did you identify in your two works of literature, and how did you analyze them in your writing?  (Refer to this document if necessary.)
  4. When you take the real Regents Exam on June 17, you will be able to use any works of literature that you like.  Which will you review as possible choices, and what makes them effective choices?
  5. What is your thesis statement?  How well did you defend it?
Remember to indicate which question you are answering by rephrasing the question as part of your response.  You will have 48 hours to complete your adversarial reflections for this section of the exam.  We will review your answers for #3 and #4 on Monday the 13th.

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Static note on adversarial scores: You will be given points for each thoughtful, focused response to the questions below, with no limit to the number of points you can earn during any adversarial reflection period.  Each post will be closed after 48 or 72 hours, depending on the day the reflection is assigned.  You are encouraged to return often to each post to read your peers’ responses; if you offer thoughtful, focused feedback to a peer’s comment, it is worth twice as many points.  See the original post on adversarial augmentation for more information on adversarial work. 

Final Exam Reflection: Part 3

For this portion of the exam, you were given a poem and an excerpt from an essay to read and annotate.  You answered a short series of multiple-choice questions, and then you wrote two short responses, each about a paragraph in length.  To reflect on your performance, answer any of the following questions in the comments:

  1. What literary elements and techniques did you identify in each passage, and how did you use them in your writing?  (Refer to this document if necessary.)
  2. How did you structure your paragraphs, and to what extent can you identify the necessary elements of a paragraph (e.g., a topic sentence, development)?
  3. Which of the passages was easier to understand and annotate, and why?
  4. What were your initial reactions to the subject of each passage?
  5. Which multiple-choice questions were most difficult to answer, and how did you determine which choice was the best?
Remember to indicate which question you are answering by rephrasing the question as part of your response.  You will have 72 hours to complete your adversarial reflections for this section of the exam.

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Static note on adversarial scores: You will be given points for each thoughtful, focused response to the questions below, with no limit to the number of points you can earn during any adversarial reflection period.  Each post will be closed after 48 or 72 hours, depending on the day the reflection is assigned.  You are encouraged to return often to each post to read your peers’ responses; if you offer thoughtful, focused feedback to a peer’s comment, it is worth twice as many points.  See the original post on adversarial augmentation for more information on adversarial work. 

Final Exam Reflection: Part 2

For this portion of the exam, you were given two passages to read and annotate.  Then you answered a short series of multiple-choice questions.  To reflect on your performance, answer any of the following questions in the comments:

  1. Which of the passages was easier to understand and annotate, and why?
  2. What were your initial reactions to the subject of each passage?
  3. How did you structure your annotations?  If you did not annotate the passages, how can you alter your approach for the exam on June 17?
  4. Which multiple-choice questions were most difficult to answer, and how did you determine which choice was the best?
Remember to indicate which question you are answering by rephrasing the question as part of your response.  You will have 48 hours to complete your adversarial reflections for this section of the exam.

Read Full Post »

Static note on adversarial scores: You will be given points for each thoughtful, focused response to the questions below, with no limit to the number of points you can earn during any adversarial reflection period.  Each post will be closed after 48 or 72 hours, depending on the day the reflection is assigned.  You are encouraged to return often to each post to read your peers’ responses; if you offer thoughtful, focused feedback to a peer’s comment, it is worth twice as many points.  See the original post on adversarial augmentation for more information on adversarial work.

Final Exam Reflection: Part 1

For this portion of the exam, you were read a short passage and asked to take notes on its main ideas.  Then you answered a short series of multiple-choice questions.  To reflect on your performance, answer any of the following questions in the comments:

  1. What was your general approach to the passage, i.e., how did you keep yourself engaged and attentive as you listened?
  2. How did you structure your notes?
  3. To what extent did you use the second reading of the passage to help you answer the multiple-choice questions?
  4. Which multiple-choice questions were most difficult to answer, and how did you determine which choice was the best?
Remember to indicate which question you are answering by rephrasing the question as part of your response.  You will have 48 hours to complete your adversarial reflections for this section of the exam.

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We’ve now spent several periods working together on 55-word narratives, and you have each begun a story of your own.  You will have two days (10/18 and 10/19) with access to computers to work on the three parts of your flash fiction:

Outline
You should have a paragraph detailing each element of the narrative.  Vague or truncated ideas will not suffice; you should push yourself to write much more here than you will in either of the following parts.  The more detail you have to distill into a 55-word narrative, the easier this will be.  Here are the narrative elements you should outline: plot, climax, conflict, resolution, protagonist, antagonist, setting, and theme.

Story
Your narrative itself must be fewer than 55 words, and it must convey the elements of the outline.  Keep the third part, the reflection, in mind as you write;  choose words and images that have strong connotations or that imply considerable detail in a small space.  Include the title in your word count.  Note: The narrative does not need to follow MLA formatting.

Reflection
Analyze your own writing by considering how you implied narrative elements in only 55 words.  Discuss each element in turn; for each, isolate verbs, adjectives, adverbs, and sensory images (i.e., images that appeal to the senses) that are meant to help the reader infer the full story.  Follow the prescribed MLA formatting here.

The outline may be completed in your compendium or on  a separate sheet of paper.  The story and reflection must both be typed, and you must upload them to Turnitin.com by 2:25 PM on Thursday, October 21.  The hard copy is due to me by the end of the day on 10/21.  Your grades will be determined as follows:

  1. Outline: 25 points (checked in on 10/18 and 10/19)
  2. Story: 25 points
  3. Story: Turnitin.com Submission: 25 points
  4. Reflection: MLA: 25 points
  5. Reflection: Turnitin.com Submission: 25 points
  6. Reflection: Content: 100 points

You should notice that you can earn 125 points for completing each step before the reflection.  That final, metacognitive pieces is the most important, and the piece that should be written most carefully and thoughtfully; it will be made easier, however, if you are careful and thoughtful in completing the preliminary steps.  There is no minimum or maximum requirement for that reflection, by the way.  One paragraph would obviously not be enough, but your unique 55-word narrative will dictate the amount that you write, your specific focuses, and how you structure the reflection.

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